Why you should see a PMP specialist

I can’t say it enough… are you dealing with a PMP specialist? If not, I would say you must.

They are the ones that have seen this stuff and the weird things it does. They can give better ideas as to what to do.
In my case, waiting seemed the best option at the time but with the specialist’s input, I chose to go ahead and now, even with the debt, the new body norms and everything, I am sooooo glad I followed his advice! He would have told me to watch and wait if in his experience there was a low risk. And I would have done it.

You have to do research to find the right medical team that is experienced in treating PMP

I didn’t have any related symptoms before my diagnosis. I went to the urologist for some UTI treatment. The doctor (my hero) ordered a CT scan. That was the beginning of my journey. PMP is so rare and the right treatment is so important. You have to do research just to find the right medical team that is experienced in treating PMP. My wife and family, of course, were there for me.

Rare Disease Day 2017, Research, Audrey Hepburn, Sean and us

Rare Disease Day is held on the last day of February every year to raise awareness of rare diseases and the theme for this year is research. Research is key as it brings hope to the millions of people living with pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) and other rare diseases across the world and to their families.

Receiving a diagnosis

My original symptom was an ‘irritated‘ bladder — it is difficult to describe but the closest I can come up with it that it felt like it was vibrating all the time. In March 2010, after several months of bladder discomfort and many trips to my GP, I was referred to the gynae-urinary clinic at my local University hospital with suspected bladder prolapse.

Megan’s Story

On November 30, 2009 Megan went to Northside Hospital, Cherokee, with severe abdominal pain. After hours of testing and exams, she was admitted to do further testing. Megan’s abdomen was swollen to the point that the doctors, had they already not tested for pregnancy, said that she looked to be about five to six months pregnant.Megan was diagnosed as having Stage 3c Ovarian Cancer. The tumors were large mucinous tumors. Megan was referred to Dr. Joseph Boveri, a gynaecological oncologist in Atlanta, to follow-up and to get this tumor removed.