Facebook pixel

I was diagnosed with high grade appendix cancer in 2021, and underwent CRS and HIPEC in Basingstoke. I joined the Pseudomyxoma Survivor group on Facebook and have found the information and support through this group so useful.

Because of my uncertain prognosis, I am keen to make lots of memories with my children, but now have limited income due to my inability to work as many hours as I used to. I applied for a grant, and was amazed to receive some money to help me to make some special memories with the kids. I can’t thank them enough.

This organisation is also fantastic as they put money towards groundbreaking research which aims to find a cure for PMP, so I will support this organisation in any way I can in order to pay back the support they have given to me.

– alyclaire

*This post first appeared on our Great Nonprofits page.

We understand, this makes a lot of sense. Having an uncertain health situation and wanting to make the most of the time you have with your kids, but also facing financial challenges due to reduced hours or inability to work – that creates a really tough set of pressures.

On the one hand, you’re absolutely right that making memories and really cherishing the time you have together is so important. Even simple things like extra family dinners, weekend trips, or creating a photo scrapbook or slideshow could become little treasures in years to come.

But on the other hand, losing significant income and having limited means puts so many restrictions on the experiences you’re able to share. Every penny probably feels crucial when health issues are also looming, so you have to balance essential expenses with trying to create experiences.

It’s not an easy road to walk by any means and we’re privileged to be able to help.

Pseudomyxoma Survivor

In case you missed it...

Why you should see a PMP specialist

Why you should see a PMP specialist

I can’t say it enough… are you dealing with a PMP specialist? If not, I would say you must.

They are the ones that have seen this stuff and the weird things it does. They can give better ideas as to what to do.
In my case, waiting seemed the best option at the time but with the specialist’s input, I chose to go ahead and now, even with the debt, the new body norms and everything, I am sooooo glad I followed his advice! He would have told me to watch and wait if in his experience there was a low risk. And I would have done it.

read more
I had cytoreduction and HIPEC and now I’ve climbed Mount Kilimanjaro!

I had cytoreduction and HIPEC and now I’ve climbed Mount Kilimanjaro!

My local hospital happens to be the centre in Israel for treating this disease and two of the surgeons working there have extensive experience in performing cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC. To those of you have undergone this procedure, I don’t need to say more. If you are still recovering or about to undergo it, I wish you excellent care, strength, patience, and a complete recovery.

read more
My baby and obstetrician saved my life!

My baby and obstetrician saved my life!

I had a caesarean section on July 12th. This took 35 min and I was delivered of a beautiful, healthy, big baby boy, weighing in at 3820 grams/8.6 pounds. During my normal c-section, I had a further operation, an ’emergency appendectomy’. I had two masses removed and further testing showed they were both cancerous tumours and I was diagnosed with pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP). I was told I would have to have further treatment in the future. The tumours showed two different types of cancer, carcinoid & appendiceal mucinous tumours.

read more
I will support Pseudomyxoma Survivor in any way I can