There are many myths out there. World Cancer Day is a chance to try and bust some of those myths.

  • Cancer is not just a health issue: it has wide-reaching social, economic, development and human rights implications.
  • Cancer is not just a health issue: a ‘whole-of society’ approach that includes non-governmental organisations, academia, 6034058[1]private sector, people living with and affected by cancer, and others, is just as important to support cancer prevention and control.
  • Cancer is not only a disease of the rich: it is a global issue and becoming an increasing public health problem in poorer countries.
  • Cancer is not only a disease of the elderly: it is a leading cause of death in many countries for children aged 5-14.
    Cancer is not only a disease of the elderly: most of the 750,000 cervical and breast cancer deaths per year occur during a woman’s reproductive years.
  • Cancer is not only a disease of developed countries: out of the 7.6 million global deaths from cancer in 2008, more than 55% occurred in less developed regions of the world.
  • Cancer isn’t a death sentence: advances in understanding risk and prevention, early detection treatment and care can lead to improved outcomes for patients. With few exceptions, early stage cancers are less lethal and more treatable than late stage cancers.
  • Around 30% of cancer cases can be prevented! Prevention is the most cost-effective and sustainable way of reducing the global cancer burden in the long-term.

If you have learnt something by reading this, please share on social media. Update your Facebook or Twitter status with “Today I learnt that…” followed by the fact and the hashtag #worldcancerday.