Survivors' Stories

Meet our inspiring PMP survivors
Courage in the face of cancer and of treatment is a common thread running through all our stories, even though they’re all very different. Read how appendix cancer and pseudomyxoma survivors have fought through stormy times and misdiagnoses, and yet somehow found an inner strength.

I thought I had a hernia

John went into hospital for a hernia operation. Afterwards, he was told that it wasn’t a hernia but a ‘small, bloody mass’. The pathology came back as pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP).

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I’ve gone from 0km to 10km in just over 6 months!

In 2015, I had cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC for pseudomxyoma peritonei. To thank Pseudomyxoma Survivor for all the support I was given and all the friends I have made through the charity, I’m doing the Southend 10K to raise funds for the charity. I would have been so alone and desperate without the charity and I cannot thank you enough x

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We thought it was nothing more than an ovarian cyst

My journey started in October 2013 (I was 53 years old), when I had an ultrasound to determine if I had gallstones or an issue with my gallbladder. The results showed a small cyst and mild fluid in my lower right abdomen area. It was decided that we would monitor the cyst and fluid and have an MRI in one year. We thought it was nothing more than an ovarian cyst. I never thought it would lead to a diagnosis of Mucinous Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma.

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The disease was actually growing out of my belly button!

I do an exercise class and I was having trouble keeping up and my belly was growing with no changes to my diet. In my head, I was thinking that was just signs of perimenopause and that was my new figure. Some women just have a muffin top at 44, right? I was also going to the restroom for frequent urination. I was under the care of a urologist for that at the time of my diagnosis with pseudomyxoma peritonei or PMP.

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I was misdiagnosed by my first surgical oncologist

When someone new to the group posts, you very often see multiple members encourage them to seek an appendix cancer specialist. That was also the case when I found the support group after I was diagnosed in June of last year. I was actually misdiagnosed by my first surgical oncologist who thought it was ovarian cancer and told me that it was well behaved and that they would remove it and I would be fine…

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Jill’s Book Review

I was really positive about my recovery after the major operation for pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP). I took things really slowly and took good care of myself.

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Why you should see a PMP specialist

I can’t say it enough… are you dealing with a PMP specialist? If not, I would say you must.

They are the ones that have seen this stuff and the weird things it does. They can give better ideas as to what to do.
In my case, waiting seemed the best option at the time but with the specialist’s input, I chose to go ahead and now, even with the debt, the new body norms and everything, I am sooooo glad I followed his advice! He would have told me to watch and wait if in his experience there was a low risk. And I would have done it.

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Both the appendix cancer survivors’ stories and the pseudomyxoma peritonei survivors’ stories contained in these pages contain the views and opinions of the individuals who have written them and do not necessarily reflect the views of Pseudomyxoma Survivor. The stories represent the experiences of the individual and should in no way be used as a guideline for your own experiences and treatment options. We are all individuals, everyone is different. We recommend that you take advice from your doctors for specific information.

Are you an appendix cancer or pseudomyxoma peritonei survivor?

We'd love to read your story

Many people find it helps to talk about their experiences. This can be helpful for others who are going through the same. We always respect your privacy — there is no expectation for you to provide a story to fully participate in our support groups or buddy scheme nor to publicly share personal details such as your name or a photograph. We are happy to support however much, or how little, you want to share with others.

If you would like to share your story with us and with other survivors, we’d love you to get in touch with us!